Saturday, October 16, 2021

October newsletter publishes Tuesday

The October 2021 issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter will be published Tuesday. The cover story is about the hypersonic cruise missile space race, where Northwest Florida's Eglin Air Force Base is a player. While superior to mature technologies, hypersonic missiles are costly and the Pentagon wants to drive down the dollars.

There’s also an article about a new test series that wrapped up at South Mississippi's Stennis Space Center. This testing was for startup company Launcher, and involved testing the thrust chamber assembly. It’s just the latest test showing SSC is a go-to for commercial space companies that want to take advantage of the facility’s extensive rocket engine test infrastructure.

The newsletter also has a column highlighting some of the significant news stories that occurred since the August newsletter. It includes an item on the contract between ST Engineering and UPS to bring highly skilled MRO workers to Pensacola, where an MRO campus at Pensacola International Airport is expanding. There's also an item about Airbus considering a new stretch version of the A220, which is built in both Canada and Mobile, Ala. There's also an update on the progress of the Artemis III at Louisiana's Michoud Assembly Facility, and a brief on an important new contracting method at Eglin Air Force Base.

The October issue will be sent to the inbox of subscribers, but others can go to our website and follow the links to download a copy. It will also be available on Facebook. Please consider liking us and becoming a follower. Just search for the Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter.

As always, our newsletters are free to readers thanks to the support of our underwriters.

Saturday, August 14, 2021

August newsletter coming soon

The August issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter will publish next week. The cover story focuses on the expected battle between Airbus and Boeing to build the KC-Y aerial tanker. Boeing will offer a modified version of its current KC-46, while Airbus will offer the A330 MRRT.

A lot has happened since the first battle between the two giants to build the replacement for the KC-135. When the contract was awarded to Boeing in 2011, Mobile had no aircraft assembly lines. Now the Alabama city is home to two - one for the A320 and one for the A220.

Importantly, the KC-Y is called the "bridge tanker" because it is the transitional tanker between the current one and a future tanker, which may end up being autonomous.

We also have a story about an electronics manufacturer in Holt, west of Crestview. Certified Manufacturing Inc., got its start in 1998, and has grown over the years focusing on high-end electronics products for the Department of Defense, NASA and aerospace companies. It's the type of home-grown company that economic development officials love.

Finally, we take a look at some of the key stories that developed in the region since the last newsletter in June, including the new training helicopter that was delivered to Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Fla., the latest engine test at Stennis Space Center, Miss., and developments designed to create a business park at Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

The newsletter will be sent to the inbox of subscribers Tuesday. Non-subscribers can read a copy at our website.

Saturday, June 12, 2021

June newsletter publishes next week

The June 2021 issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter will be published Tuesday. The cover story is about the virtual briefing held last month highlighting Stennis Space Center, Miss., and Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

The two NASA facilities at the west-end of the Gulf Coast I-10 aerospace corridor are critical to NASA's current Space Launch System program, and they have a major economic impact both regionally and globally. The directors of Stennis Space Center and Michoud Assembly Facility gave presentations, as did the leader of the Naval Oceanographic office, a major tenant at Stennis.

It's a story about some of the wins and some of the losses caused by the pandemic and a particularly rough 2020 hurricane season, twin challenges everyone in the Gulf Coast region has in common.

There's also a profile on Verdell Hawkins, the economic development executive at Pensacola-based Gulf Power. He provides some insight into how he got involved in the field, and some of the projects in Northwest Florida where Gulf Power worked with local economic development groups.

There's also a column hitting on some of the key aerospace-related activities impacting the Gulf Coast region.

The June issue will be sent to the inbox of subscribers, but others can go to our website and follow the links to download a copy June 15. For Facebook users, we launched a Facebook page in December where readers can go to see the entire newsletter or individual stories. Comments are welcome. Please consider liking us and becoming a follower. Just search for the Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter.

As always, our newsletters are free to readers thanks to the support of our underwriters.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

April newsletter publishes Tuesday

The April 2021 issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter will be published Tuesday. The cover story is about the effort to create two new space-related technology parks near two NASA facilities – one in Louisiana and one in Mississippi.

Enterprise Park is a more than 1,000-acre park on the north side of Stennis Space Center. It’s been in discussion nearly four years now, and much of the delay has been because of the pandemic. But NASA has approved plans for the center to send out announcements for proposals to develop the park. A new office for specialized business development is also being established at the space center, with hiring about to start.

Another proposed park is about 40 miles away outside NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility. Called the Louisiana Space Campus, it's a 50-acre spread at Michoud that will target commercial office development for existing tenants as well as bring in new public and private partners. Should both reach fruition, it would cement this region's reputation in the space field at a time when commercial space activities are growing.

There’s also a story about Gulf Power's recent virtual symposium, including a discussion about Florida and how it fared better than most during the pandemic. While Gulf Power opted to do a virtual event, it still plans to hold a full-blown symposium in September.

There’s also an article about the upcoming TeCMEN Industry Day, where a contender for the Armed Overwatch program will be discussed. Plans are to build that contender, the Bronco II, in Crestview, Fla.

Finally, there’s a story about the recently released Milken Institute Best-Performing Cities Index. It shows that most of the metro areas in the Gulf Coast I-10 region performed quite well and improved their ranking. Two standouts were the Daphne-Fairhope-Foley metro area in Alabama and Crestview-Fort Walton Beach-Destin metro area in Florida.

The April issue will be sent to the inbox of subscribers, but others can go to our website and follow the links to download a copy April 13. For Facebook users, we launched a Facebook page in December where readers can go to see the entire newsletter or individual stories. Comments are welcome. Please consider liking us and becoming a follower. Just search for the Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter.

As always, our newsletters are free to readers thanks to the support of our underwriters.

Monday, February 8, 2021

February issue publishes Tuesday

The first issue of 2021 of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter will be published Tuesday. The February issue’s cover story is about the recently released Industrial Capabilities Report from the Defense Department. It’s the annual assessment of the health of the nation’s defense industries.

The report covers industries including aircraft, spacecraft, missiles and munitions, shipbuilding, electronics, cybersecurity, and more. Many if not most are of interest to the Gulf Coast I-10 region. In addition to summarizing the findings, we also give you an overview of what the report says about two of the industries most-closely linked to aerospace: aircraft and space.

We also have a story about the large number of military retirees in the 18 counties and parishes spanning the region between New Orleans and Panama City. These retirees bring millions in retirement money to the region every month, which is a boon for local economies. But the retirees – who retire at a younger age than their civilian counterparts – also provide a ready pool of highly skilled workers, many of them going on the pursue careers outside the military.

We also fill you in on the recently completed Green Run of NASA’s Space Launch System. That’s the test where all four of the RS-25 engines are fired at the same time. But the January test only lasted just over a minute instead of the planned eight minutes. So we’ll fill you in on the second test planned for late February. We also have a story about the new series of tests for single RS-25 engines that just got underway.

As usual, the February issue will be sent to the inbox of subscribers, but others can go to our website to download a copy. As always, it’s free thanks to the support of our underwriters.

Regular readers will notice the February issue is smaller than in the past – six instead of eight pages. As I mentioned in the previous paragraph, we rely on annual underwriters to fund an entire year of six issues rather than charging readers. That's because we think the stories about our aerospace and aviation activities are too important to put behind a pay wall. The downside of that is it means some years we’ll fall below our required funding level, and 2021 is just such a year.

But unlike some publications, which might tell you you're getting something "improved" when they have to cut back on staff or product, we won't insult your intelligence. You’re getting fewer pages and stories this year, but we can promise you that we will cut no corners when it comes to providing you with quality stories. If that means a smaller product, so be it.

Finally, we launched a Facebook page in December where readers can go to see the entire newsletter or individual stories – and comment if they so desire. If you are on Facebook, please consider liking us and becoming a follower. Just look for Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter. The February newsletter will be there Tuesday.

Saturday, December 19, 2020

December newsletter coming

The year is drawing to a close, and the December issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Newsletter will be published Tuesday. While it’s likely you may be too busy getting ready for the holidays, it will be there to read when you have some time.

This eight-page issue focuses on the incoming Biden administration, and what it might mean for the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor. Let’s face it: there is a lot of uncertainty when any new administration comes in, and this one is no different.

Reporter Timothy Boone takes a look at what a Biden administration might mean for the region’s two NASA operations, one in New Orleans and the other in South Mississippi. The expectation is NASA under a new administration might focus more on climate change and earth science. But as you’ll find out, that’s primarily a reading of the tea leaves, since the transition team has not had a lot to say about space issues.

What about national defense? This region is heavy with military bases, most of them aviation focused, so a new administration’s views on national defense are always of high interest. Reporter Lisa Monti delves into that issue. At this juncture, it doesn’t appear there will be any sort of dramatic shift that will impact the defense budget.

Jane Nicholes has a column in this issue where she takes a look at what the new administration might mean for the Airbus operation in Mobile, where the issue of tariffs caused some concerns over the past few years. Airbus established the operation in Mobile as a hedge against any protectionist policies, and it has been quite successful. The new administration is likely to have no specific impact on Airbus, but it's likely to change the trajectory of relationships with allies when it comes to trade.

But all of it is overshadowed by the still raging worldwide coronavirus pandemic. Our cover story takes a look at that, because the incoming administration has said that everything for the economy’s future depends on controlling it. While we are now in one of the darkest times as deaths continue to rise, there are some encouraging signs that we may find out way out of it in 2021.

The issue will be sent to the inbox of subscribers, but others can go to our website to download a copy. As always, it’s free thanks to the ongoing support of our underwriters.

One more thing. We are in the process of creating a Facebook page where readers can go to see our stories, and to comment if they so desire. It will be up and running before the end of the year.

The best to all of you.

Sunday, October 18, 2020

October newsletter coming

The October issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor/Gulf Coast Reporters League newsletter will be published Tuesday, Oct. 20.

The cover story by Timothy Boone is about next month's Green Run test of NASA's Space Launch System core stage at Stennis Space Center, Miss. During the test, all four RS-25 engines will be fired up to test the system and controls. It will be loud, and it will be a crucial test.

We also have in the eight-page newsletter a profile of Scott Luth, executive director of FloridaWest Economic Development Alliance. Reporter Martha Simmons will tell you how this Ohio native got involved in economic development, and what brought him to Pensacola.

Reporter Jane Nicholes will provides and update on plans for the Mobile Downtown Airport. Right now flights go to Mobile Regional Airport to the west of Mobile, but the new airport at the Mobile Aeroplex is south of downtown and much closer.

Finally, I review a non-fiction book by Ken Fortenberry. I once worked for Ken when he was managing editor of the Pensacola News Journal. His book, "Flight 7 Is Missing," is a whodunit about why his father's passenger plane went down in the Pacific in 1957, when Ken was just six. Part of the title is "The Search For My Father's Killer," which should pique your curiosity.

The newsletter is scheduled to be published Tuesday, and the PDF will be sent to the inbox of subscribers. If you're not a subscriber, you can get the newsletter PDF Tuesday at www.gulfcoastaerospacecorridor.com.

Saturday, August 8, 2020

August newsletter coming

The August issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor/Gulf Coast Reporters League Aerospace Newsletter will publish Tuesday, Aug. 11.

The cover story is about the new era of helicopter aviator training at Naval Air Station Whiting Field, Fla. In addition to getting a technologically superior helicopter, Santa Rosa County broke ground on a temporary maintenance hangar for helicopter-maker Leonardo, which will be used until a new maintenance hangar is built at Whiting Aviation Park in Milton.

There's also a story about Matt Coughlin, the new director of Pensacola International Airport. The former naval aviator comes aboard at a time when the airport - like others nationwide - is slowly coming back from the impact of the pandemic.

We'll also tell you about a new education program from Embry-Riddle and its partners. Called “Aviation Maintenance SkillBridge,” the training program begins at Hurlburt Field in Northwest Florida Oct. 19, with an initial class of up to nine students. It's designed to make it easier for soon-to-be discharged military personnel to land high-paying jobs in civilian aviation.

We also have a story about Flight Works Alabama in Mobile. It opened this month and features hands-on exhibits and educational opportunities to pique interest in aviation.

The newsletter will be emailed to subscribers, and non-subscribers can download the eight-page report at our website, Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor, starting Tuesday.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

June newsletter published

The June issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor/Gulf Coast Reporters League Aerospace Newsletter is now available for download.

The cover story is about Airbus in Mobile, Ala., which is doing well despite the pandemic. It had to pause production for a while, but is now assembling A320 and A220 jetliners again.

There's also a story about Relativity Space, which is planning to build 3D printed rockets at Stennis Space Center, Miss. The company is planning a big test this year that will involved attaching one of its rocket engines to the rocket.

We all know airports have suffered in the pandemic, and Pensacola International Airport is no different. But passenger counts are beginning to tick upwards, certainly a good sign for the future.

Finall, there is a review of the most important aerospace news items that occurred since the last newsletter in April.

Sunday, April 12, 2020

April newsletter coming Tuesday

The April issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor/Gulf Coast Reporters League Newsletter will publish Tuesday with the usual eight-page lineup.

The cover story is about the pandemic and its impact on the aerospace operations in our region. Airbus has paused the assembly of A320 and A220 jetliners in Mobile, and NASA has had to curtail work on the Space Launch System and Orion crew vehicle at Stennis Space Center, Miss., and Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

We also know that air travel has taken a beating, and found that Pensacola International Airport is one example that serves to show how it’s impacted airports all over the region. There’s a drop of 90 percent in passengers. We’ll also fill you in on a one-day closing at ST Engineering Aerospace in Pensacola.

We didn’t write about it, but the coronavirus and the shut-down also impacted the story lineup of this newsletter. Two stories had to be put on the back burner because the shut-down impacted their operations. Once we’re past this pandemic, will bring those two stories to you.

But we also have three articles not related to the pandemic. One is about a drone program used by Gulf Power, and the other is about the recent Gulf Power Economic Symposium – one of the last big gatherings before the coronavirus was declared a pandemic. Finally, we take a look at some of the important aerospace stories that occurred since the last newsletter in February.

Subscribers will receive the newsletter in their inbox, but everyone else can download a copy at our website.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Newsletter coming Feb. 18

The February issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor/Gulf Coast Reporters League Newsletter will publish Tuesday with the usual eight-page, four-story lineup.

The cover story is about Airbus, which continues to grow its operation in Mobile. The aerospace giant assembles the A320 and A220 series of passenger jets at the Mobile campus, and earlier this week Airbus increased its ownership of the A220 project by purchasing shares that had been owned by Canada’s Bombardier.

The newsletter also has a story about Pensacola International Airport and its growth. It’s always a bit tricky trying to forecast growth in passenger traffic, but the airport made adjustments to accommodate a larger number than predicted.

We also fill you in on the upcoming 23rd Gulf Power Economic Symposium that will be held at Sandestin Resort in Miramar. It’s expected to attract more than 600 participants from the region with the theme, “2020 See Beyond.”

There’s also a story about the Navy choosing a helicopter built by Leonardo to serve as the platform that will train the nation’s future Navy, Marine and Coast Guard helicopter pilots. Santa Rosa County ends up benefiting from that selection because Leonardo plans to have a repair facility at the new Whiting Aviation Park.

Subscribers will receive the newsletter in their inbox, but everyone else can download a copy at our website.

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Week in review (12/22 to 12/28)

The year is rapidly drawing to a close, and this Week in Review will be the last for the year. In fact, it’s going on an indefinite hiatus as we begin 2020.

Funding from underwriters has dwindled to the point where we have to reduce our product load. It made sense to drop the Week in Review since it’s primarily a recap of news items already available on our daily news feed.

The column is not going away entirely. We’ll post columns from time to time as the need arises, likely whenever a big story in 2020 calls for additional attention. For those who have been loyal readers, we thank you.

Now for your week in review, a typically slow week during the Christmas season:

Contracts
Raytheon Missile Systems Co., Tucson, Ariz., was awarded a $768.3 million contract for Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) Production Lot 33. This contract provides for the production of the AMRAAM missiles, captive air training missiles, guidance sections, AMRAAM telemetry system, spares and other production engineering support hardware. Work will be performed in Tucson with an expected completion date of Feb. 28, 2023. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Air Dominance Division Contracting Office, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Saturday, December 21, 2019

Week in review (12/15 to 12/21)

Early this week the December issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter was published and is now available for your reading enjoyment. It takes a look at the key aviation-related stories in the Gulf Coast region during 2019, and also looks forward to what might happen in 2020. (Post)

There were plenty of contracts awarded during the week, most of them related to the F-35 program. That’s of interest because Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is home of an F-35 training center and reprogramming labs. Here's the contracts in review:

Contracts – Lockheed Martin
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded a $7 billion modification to a previously awarded contract for F-22 air vehicle sustainment. This modification provides for the exercise of an option for additional five year ordering period for comprehensive F-22 air vehicle sustainment. Work will be performed at five operational bases: Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska; Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.; Tyndall AFB, Fla.; Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va.; and Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii; and at six support locations: Edwards AFB, Calif.; Palmdale, Calif.; Hill AFB, Utah; Tinker AFB, Okla.; Sheppard AFB, Texas; and Warner Robins AFB, Ga.; as well as at other potential stateside and overseas locations. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hill AFB, Utah, is the contracting activity. … Lockheed also was awarded a $9 million contract that provides support to establish the common reprogramming tool development network and selection of a service-oriented architecture needed to commence development of enhanced reprogramming tools, which is essential for all standing labs in support of the F-35 aircraft for the Navy and the government of Australia. Work will be performed at Fort Worth, Texas (97%) and Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (3%), and is expected to be completed in December 2020. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. … Lockheed also was awarded a $50.2 million modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification exercises an option to procure unique F-35 Autonomic Logistics Information System hardware and support equipment for the Marine Corps. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. … Lockheed also was awarded an $8.9 million modification to a delivery order previously placed against a basic ordering agreement. This modification is for the procurement of modification kits required for modification and retrofit activities in support of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Aircraft for the Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy. Work will be performed in Fort Worth and is expected to be completed in December 2024. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Contracts – UTC
United Technologies Corp., Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Conn., was awarded a $455.5 million modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification provides for non-recurring engineering and tooling in support of the lot 14 production and delivery of 32 F135-PW-100 propulsion systems and one F135-PW-600 propulsion system for F-35 Joint Program Office non-Department of Defense (DoD) participants. Work will be performed in East Hartford (97%); Indianapolis, Ind. (2%); and Bristol, United Kingdom (1%), and is expected to be completed in April 2022. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. … UTC also was awarded a $58.4 million task order against a previously issued basic ordering agreement. This order provides non-recurring engineering for early identification, development and qualification of corrections to potential and actual operational issues, including safety, reliability and maintainability problems identified through fleet usage, accelerated mission testing, continues engine maturation and evaluates component life limits based on operational experience in support of the F-35 aircraft for the Navy, Air Force; non-Department of Defense (DoD) participants and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers. Work will be performed in East Hartford (87%) and Indianapolis, Ind. (13%), and is expected to be completed in December 2024. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.

Contracts – Others
Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded a $22.5 million contract to provide engineering, cyber security, system software, logistics and training services in support of the MQ-8 Fire Scout Unmanned Air Systems. Work will be performed at San Diego and is expected to be completed in December 2020. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. Moss Point, Miss., does final assembly work on the MQ-8 Fire Scout. … Georgia Tech Applied Research Corp., Atlanta, Georgia, was awarded an $85 million contract for the Golden Horde Science and Technology demonstration effort. The five year contract provides support for research and development of emerging munition technologies, as well as integrated weapon demonstrations. Work will be performed at Atlanta. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. … Boeing Aerospace Operations Inc., St. Louis, Mo., was awarded a $92.3 million contract action. This contract provides engineering technical services in support of Naval Aviation weapon systems and all associated systems and equipment throughout their sustainment life-cycle, to include contractor field services in support of the AV-8B, EA-18G, F/A-18, C-40, and P-8A aircraft for the Navy and the government of Kuwait. Work will be performed in Iwakuni, Japan (17.88%); Oceana, Va. (8.48%); Whidbey Island, Wash. (8.25%); New Orleans, La. (7.26%); Miramar, Calif. (6.85%); Beaufort, S.C. (5.45%); Kuwait (5.36%); Fort Worth, Texas (5.06%); North Island, Calif. (5.06%); Jacksonville, Fla.(4.61%); Pensacola, Fla. (3.63%); Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii (3.63%); Patuxent River, Md. (3.63%); China Lake, Calif. (3.63%); Cherry Point, N.C. (3.63%); Yuma, Ariz., (3.63%); Fallon, Nev. (1.8%); Lemoore, Calif. (1.8%); various locations within the continental U.S. (.3%); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (.06%), and is expected to be completed in December 2024. The Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division, China Lake, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Saturday, December 14, 2019

Week in review (12/8 to 12/14)

The December issue of the Gulf Coast Aerospace Corridor Newsletter will be published next week. It takes a look back at the key aerospace stories during 2019, and also looks ahead at what we can expect in the coming year.

It will be sent to subscribers' inboxes, but non-subscribers can look for it next week at our webpage.

Now for your week in review:

All eight of the people injured in the Dec. 6 shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., have been released from the hospital, according to the Pensacola News Journal.

The mass shooting at the base left three sailors dead: 19-year-old Mohammed Sameh Haitham, 21-year-old Cameron Scott Walters, and 23-year-old Joshua Kaleb Watson. The Navy has since posthumously awarded all three Wings of Gold.

The investigation into the mass shooting continues. The gunman, a Royal Saudi Air Force aviation student, was killed by deputies. The Navy has grounded about 300 Saudi military trainees at NAS Pensacola, NAS Whiting Field near Milton and NAS Mayport in Jacksonville. Classroom teaching, however, is continuing.

The safety stand-down was issued pending results of an FBI investigation of the shooting. Investigators believe Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, 21, acted alone. (Post)

The FBI is presuming the fatal shooting was terrorism, but the agency has yet to declare an official motive. The handgun used by Alshamrani was a 9mm Glock bought legally in Florida, according to the FBI. (Post)

Contracts
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded an $18 million modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification provides for the maintenance and operation of the Australia, Canada, United Kingdom Reprogramming Laboratory (ACURL). This effort includes sustainment support for all ACURL systems to include consumables for the F-35 aircraft in support of the governments of Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. Work will be performed at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., and is expected to be completed in February 2021. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. … DMR Consulting Inc., Panama City Beach, Fla., was awarded a $9 million modification to previously awarded contract to exercise the option for the depot level repair, overhaul and modification for the MK-105 Magnetic Minesweeping Gear. This option exercise is for depot level repair and maintenance of the MK105 Magnetic Minesweeping Gear. The MK105 Magnetic Influence Minesweeping System, better known as the "sled," is a high-speed catamaran hydrofoil platform, which is towed behind the MH-53E helicopter and is used to sweep magnetic influence mines. Work will be performed in Panama City, Fla., and is expected to be completed by December 2020. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division, Panama City, is the contracting activity. … Arete Associates Inc., Northridge, Calif., was awarded a $17.6 million modification to a previously-awarded contract to exercise Option 2, to provide Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis (COBRA) Block I systems. Work will be performed in Destin, Fla. (35%); Tucson, Ariz. (35%); and Santa Rosa, Calif. (30%), and is expected to be completed by July 2022. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division, Panama City, Fla., is the contracting activity. … Primus, Beltsville, Md., was awarded an $8.8 million contract for cold and hot aviation refuel and defuel services, personnel, management, parts, supplies, transportation and vehicles/trucks. Work will be performed in Daleville, Ala., with an estimated completion date of June 16, 2020. U.S. Army Mission Installation Contracting Command, Fort Eustis, Va., is the contracting activity.

Saturday, December 7, 2019

Week in review (12/1 to 12/7)

While there were multiple important stories during the week for the Gulf Coast aerospace corridor, the one that caught the most attention was the slaying of three people at Naval Air Station Pensacola and the death of the shooter.

The shooter has been identified as Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, a second lieutenant in the Saudi Air Force. Authorities are trying to determine if the shooting in the large school complex was terror-related, but even before that, there are multiple troubling reports about the shooter that have been published. The Associated Press is reporting that Alshamrani hosted a dinner party earlier in the week where he and three others watched videos of mass shootings.

NAS Pensacola, the nation’s first air station, is a key training facility for the Navy. Parts of the base look like a college campus, including Building 633, where the shootings occurred. The base is where 60,000 members of the Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard receive training each year in multiple aviation-related technical fields. Students at the base include a couple hundred from U.S. partner nations. (Post)

The shooter used a handgun to kill his victims. The FBI is leading the investigation into the shootings. Officials did not say how long the gunman had been training at the base. Building 633 where the shooting occurred is multi-story and houses schools for aviation technical training. (Post)

The eight people injured were sent to area hospitals.

The shooting occurred before 7 a.m. CST. The base has 16,000 military and 7,400 civilians and is a key Navy technical training base. It’s also home of the Blue Angels flight demonstration team, Barrancas National Cemetery, and the National Naval Aviation Museum, which is also the location of the National Flight Academy. (Post)

One of victims of the shooting has been identified by his family. Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis this year and arrived in Pensacola two weeks ago for flight training. According to his brother, he was shot multiple times but made his way outside to tell first responders where the shooter was. (Post)

Space
Over in Mississippi, Lockheed Martin is expanding its operations at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Hancock County in a $20.9 million investment that will create 30 jobs.

Lockheed Martin Mississippi Space and Technology Center’s primary activity at SSC is to design and build satellites and spacecraft for government and commercial customers. It opened in 2002 and provides thermal blankets and installs the engines that maneuver satellites in orbit.

For the expansion, Lockheed Martin is centralizing select thermal production capabilities to its Stennis location and will begin manufacturing products that are key components of all spacecraft currently manufactured by the company.

The Mississippi Development Authority is providing assistance for building renovations. The project qualifies for tax abatements under the Hancock County Board of Supervisors’ current incentives program. (Post)

Education
Also in Mississippi, Pearl River Community College broke ground Tuesday on the Phil Bryant Aviation and Aerospace Workforce Academy in Hancock County, across from Stennis International Airport.

It received a $2 million grant from the Department of Economic Development Administration, matched with more than $3.9 million in state and local investments and is expected to help create 469 jobs, retain 550 jobs, and generate $5 million in private investments.

The academy will be an estimated 25,000 square feet and represents a new and expanded presence for PRCC in Hancock County. It will consist of eight classrooms, five labs, reception area, faculty and staff offices, and more.

The academy will include a hangar of some 18,000 square feet and will consist of two classrooms with labs, open hangar area with hands-on lab stations. The facility is expected to be complete in 2021.

Among other things, students will be able to study welding, precision manufacturing, instrumentation, industrial electronics, and more. (Post)

Airbus
United Airlines has placed a firm order for 50 Airbus A321XLR aircraft as it begins to phase out older models and launches an expansion of transatlantic routes from its key U.S. hubs in Newark/New York and Washington D.C.

United plans to take delivery of the first A321XLR in 2024 and expects to begin international service with the aircraft in 2025. The A321XLR is the next evolutionary step in the A320neo/A321neo series of aircraft to meet market demand for an increased range and payload in a single-aisle aircraft.

It will allow service from the U.S. East Coast to a much larger selection of European destinations. At the end of October 2019, the A320neo Family had accumulated more than 7,000 firm orders from over 110 customers worldwide. Many of these aircraft will likely be built in Mobile, Ala. (Post)

Contracts
Lockheed Martin Missile and Fire Control, Orlando, Fla., was awarded a $988.8 million modification to a previously-awarded contract for Air-Launched Rapid Response Weapon critical design review, test and production readiness support. Work will be done in Orlando and is expected to be completed Dec. 31, 2022. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. … Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded a $153.4 million modification to a previously-awarded contract. This modification procures special tooling and special test equipment required to meet current and future F-35 Lightning II low-rate initial production as well as full-rate production rates. Work will be performed in Italy, California, Texas, Utah, Georgia, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Vermont, Norway, and New York and is expected to be completed in December 2023. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is home of an F-35 training center. … BAE Systems Technology Solutions and Services Inc., Rockville, Md., was awarded a $12.6 million contract modification to a previously-awarded contract to exercise Option Two. The contract modification extends the contract term for an additional 12 months in order to continue providing diminishing manufacturing sources and material shortages support for Air Force and non-Air Force users supporting the Air Force, to proactively reduce mission capability impacts to improve logistics support and weapon system sustainability. Work will be performed in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., as well as Utah, Georgia, and Oklahoma, and is expected to be completed by June 20, 2021. The Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker Air Force Base, is the contracting activity.

Saturday, November 30, 2019

Week in review (11/24 to 11/30)

Airbus celebrated the 100th A220 aircraft produced for a customer during a ceremony at Mirabel, Canada. The A220-300 is destined for Latvia-based airBaltic, and features a new cabin layout with 149 seats.

The A220 series is assembled at the main final assembly line in Mirabel, and more recently a second assembly line in Mobile, Ala. The world’s first A220, formerly called the CSeries, was delivered in June 2016.

Close to 100 A220s are in operation with six companies on four continents. At the end of October 2019, the aircraft had received 530 firm orders from over 20 customers worldwide. (press release)

In another item during the week, the Orion spacecraft left Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Fla., Nov. 24 aboard a Super Guppy aircraft for testing at the world’s largest thermal vacuum chamber. The Super Guppy landed at Mansfield, Ohio and the Orion was transfer to NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.

In two phases of testing at NASA’s Glenn Test Center, engineers and technicians from Airbus, the European Space Agency (ESA), Lockheed Martin and NASA will put the spacecraft through simulations of extreme space conditions.

In the two-month thermal test Orion's electrical systems will be switched on and operated under vacuum and in temperatures which simulate the environmental conditions in space. The second phase is an electromagnetic compatibility test, which lasts about 14 days.

In recent months the Orion crew module and the service module were mated at KSC. If the Ohio tests are successful, Orion will return to KSC, where further tests and preparations for integration with the Space Launch System (SLS) will start before the launch of Artemis I at the end of 2020. The plan for Artemis I is to have the uncrewed spacecraft travel once around the Moon and back to Earth.

Airbus in Bremen, Germany, is already building the second Orion Service Module, with which astronauts will fly to the Moon and back to Earth. ESA's European Service Module will provide propulsion, power, air and water for the astronauts, as well as thermal control of the entire spacecraft. (press release)

Contract – engineering services
Schmidt-Prime Group LLC, Pensacola, Fla., was awarded a $30 million contract for professional architectural and engineering services in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast area of operations (AO).

The work to be performed provides for preparation of professional architectural and engineering services for preparation of design-bid-build documents and design-build request for proposals for various project types at Department of Defense (DoD) and non-DoD activities in the NAVFAC Southeast AO.

Initial task order is being awarded at $441,467 to provide engineering services to update the installation DD Form 1391 project documentation and prepare the region team final DD Form 1391 for the Advanced Helicopter Training System at Naval Air Station, Whiting Field, Milton, Fla.

Work for this task order is expected to be completed by March 2020. All work on this contract will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps installations in the NAVFAC Southeast AO including, but not limited to, Florida (20%); Georgia (17%); South Carolina (15%); Louisiana (10%); Mississippi (10%); Texas (10%); Andros Island, Bahamas (5%); Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (5%); Tennessee (3%); Alabama (1%); Arkansas (1%); Kansas (1%); Missouri (1%); and Oklahoma (1%), and is expected to be completed by November 2024.

NAVFAC Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Contract – F-35
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded an $831 million modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification provides for the production and delivery of 15 lot 14 F-35A aircraft and associated red gear in support of the government of Australia. Work will be performed in Texas, California, Florida, New Hampshire, Maryland, the United Kingdom, and Italy, and various locations outside the continental U.S., and is expected to be completed in March 2023. … Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, also was awarded a $328 million contract to procure long lead material, parts and components in support of the Lot 15 production and delivery of 48 F-35A Lightning II aircraft for the Air Force. Work will be performed in Texas, California, Florida, New Hampshire, Maryland, and the United Kingdom, and is expected to be completed in June 2023. … Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Conn., was awarded a $522 million contract modification. This modification provides performance based logistics sustainment in support of the F-35 Lightning II F135 propulsion system for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, non-Department of Defense (DoD) participants and foreign military sales (FMS) customers. Two percent of the work will be done at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. Other work locations are Connecticut, Oklahoma, California, Utah, Arizona, South Carolina, and Italy, and is expected to be completed in November 2020. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity for all three contracts.

Contracts: Munitions/trainers
The Raytheon Co., Tucson, Ariz., was awarded a $386 million modification to a previously awarded contract for the total package approach (TPA) to the Paveway Family of Weapons. The contract action provides a TPA for Paveway-specific activities including, but not limited to: studies, production, certification, integration and sustainment. Work will be performed at Tucson and Air Force test ranges. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Direct Attack Branch, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. … L3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Miss., was awarded a $77 million contract for contractor operated and maintained base supply of the Air Education and Training Command fleet of 178 T-1A trainer aircraft. Work will be performed at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas; Laughlin AFB, Texas; Vance AFB, Okla.; Columbus AFB, Miss., and Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2020. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., is the contracting activity.

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Week in review (11/17 to 11/23)

Training Air Wing 5 marked a milestone in naval aviation Friday when the 35,000th rotary wing student naval aviator walked across the stage at Naval Air Station Whiting Field to receive his Wings of Gold.

Lt. j.g. Robert Woods of Northlake, Ill., walked off the stage at the Lassen Auditorium as the Navy’s newest helicopter pilot. He joined 22 other students in achieving the designation. The plaque he received is typical of the wit displayed by naval aviators.

"Through no great effort of your own and by no selection means other than being near the bottom of the alphabet during your winging class, you are hereby selected as the 35,000th rotary wing aviator. Congratulations, this number should be easy to remember."

It’s funny, but the true achievement is the number itself. In the 76-plus years of naval helicopter training, for the last 46 years that training has been done at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Milton, Fla.

Woods will go on to fly the MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter with the Airwolves of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron Forty in Jacksonville, Fla. (Post)

-- Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Chris Grove, a special tactics combat controller assigned as the 720th Special Tactics Group based at Hurlburt Field, Fla., was awarded the nation’s third-highest medal for gallantry against an armed enemy, the Silver Star.

He was originally awarded the Bronze Star in October 2008, but due to a review of awards within the 24th Special Operations Wing, he was upgraded to a Silver Star.

The action occurred in November 2007 during a reconnaissance patrol in Afghanistan. Grove was able to call in air strikes against the Taliban that had taken uphill positions. delivered thousands of pounds of munition, securing the safety of his joint and partner forces. Lt. Gen. Jim Slife, commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, presented the medal during a ceremony, November 15. (Post)

-- The "Sabrehawks" of Training Squadron (VT) 86 held a change-of-command ceremony Nov. 14 at Naval Air Station Pensacola, where Cmdr. Eric Reeves relieved Cmdr. Joshua Fuller as commanding officer.

During his tenure, Fuller saw 224 Naval Flight Officers received their Wings of Gold and together accumulated more than 19,000 hours in the T-45C Goshawk jet trainer. Fuller, a graduate of Samford University in Alabama, earned his wings in December 2001. Reeves is a native of Baldwinsville, N.Y., and a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute graduate earning his commission through the Navy ROTC program. He earned his wings in 2003 as a naval flight officer.

Cmdr. George Zintak, a native of Chicago, will assume the role of executive officer. VT-86 graduates complete follow-on training with fleet replacement squadrons to prepare them for future fleet aircraft including the F/A-18 Hornet/Super Hornet and E/A-18G Growler. (Post)

Contracts
United Technologies Corp., Pratt and Whitney Engines, East Hartford, Conn., was awarded a $762.5 million to a previously awarded contract. This modification exercises options for the Lot 14 production and delivery of 48 F135-PW-100 propulsion systems for the Air Force and 10 F135-PW-600 propulsion systems for the Marine Corps. Work will be performed in Connecticut, Indiana, and the United Kingdom and is expected to be completed in April 2022. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity. Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is home of the F-35 integrated training center. … Raytheon Missiles Systems Co., Tucson, Ariz., was awarded a $72 million contract for advanced medium range air to air missile (AMRAAM) technical support. Work will be performed in Tucson and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2025. The Air Force Lifecycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. … Raytheon Missile Systems Co., Tucson, Ariz., also was awarded an $11 million modification to a previously awarded contract for Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) Production program. Work will be performed in Tucson and is expected to be complete by Dec. 15, 2021. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity.

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Week in review (11/10 to 11/16)

Will NASA's Stennis Space Center, Miss., take on yet one more role in the future?

Perhaps.

Earlier this month U.S. Sens. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., introduced the Licensing Innovations and Future Technologies in Space (LIFTS) Act.

According to the press release, the bill would modernize training for the federal commercial space licensing workforce and promote collaboration with academia and industry by creating a centralized training facility for safety and licensing personnel.

The new facility would be at Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, just across the Louisiana state line.

"Stennis Space Center is the perfect location for training more space professionals to certify the growing demand for commercial space launches in the United States," Wicker said in the release. "This legislation would help ensure the U.S. remains the leader in the commercial space industry and would expand Mississippi's contributions to the future of space exploration and research."

"The federal oversight and licensing of commercial space technologies will require a workforce qualified to certify the safety and efficiency of those breakthroughs. The LIFTS Act would tap the expertise based at the Stennis Space Center to establish a facility to meet this critical need," Hyde-Smith said.

The LIFTS Act would establish a facility to train federal employees to license commercial space activities. The training program would be coordinated between the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, the commercial space industry, and academic partners. (Release)

Stennis Space Center is packed with activities. It's where NASA and commercial companies test rocket engines. Some rocket engines are also assembled there, and a California-based company plans to print 3D rockets there. It's  also home to some 40 tenants involved in a variety of fields, including oceanography.

A tip-of-the-hat to Ed, who drew my attention to this story.

By the way, if you decide to look up the LIFTS Act on the internet, don't confuse it with something called the LIFT Act. That's a plan by Democratic candidate Kamala Harris to provide a cash payment to middle-class households.

Speaking of space, all four RS-25 engines were recently mated to the core stage for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket for Artemis I, the first mission of SLS and NASA's Orion spacecraft.

To complete assembly of the rocket stage, engineers and technicians are now integrating the propulsion and electrical systems within the structure. The stage, which includes two huge propellant tanks, provides more than 2 million pounds of thrust to send Artemis I to the Moon.

Engineers and technicians at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans attached the fourth RS-25 engine to the rocket stage Nov. 6 just one day after structurally mating the third engine. (Post)

Military
The Air Force identified the missing airman who fell out of a C-130 over the Gulf of Mexico during a training exercise as 29-year-old Special Tactics combat controller Staff Sgt. Cole Condiff.

The Dallas native fell about 1,500 feet from the plane during a parachute training exercise. His parachute was deployed and he was seen treading water. Condiff was with the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron, 24th Special Operations Wing. (Post)

Contracts
Raytheon Co. Missile Systems Division, Tucson, Ariz., was awarded an $18.6 million modification exercising the first option year of three options to previously awarded FA8675-19-C-0004 for fiscal 2020 High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM) Targeting System (HTS) Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) services. Work will be performed at Tucson and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2020. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity.



Saturday, November 9, 2019

Week in review (11/3 to 11/9)

Late last month NASA selected Tuskegee University (TU), the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Virginia State University (VSU) in Petersburg for a NASA program to provide students at minority-serving institutions the education and experience needed to help address manufacturing needs in the American aerospace sector.

Tuskegee will focus on 3D printing, also called additive manufacturing. It will work with Bell Helicopter and NASA to accelerate the integration of 3D printing into high-volume aerospace manufacturing and supply chain management for helicopters and drones.

Bell will identify critical helicopter parts and work with TU to develop a complete business case for the use of 3D printing in the manufacture of those parts. In the drone track, TU will incorporate 3D printing into the design, build, and test phases of drone development to improve the functionality and performance of these aircraft. The work will be conducted in increments to allow for continuous assessment of the quality performance of 3D-printed parts.

Bell has a manufacturing operation in Ozark, Ala., which produces the Fire Scout unmanned helicopter. The Ozark site also has been selected by Bell to build the 407GXi, should Bell win the competition to build the new Navy helicopter trainer that will replace the TH-57. Airbus Helicopter's H135 and Leonardo Helicopter's TH-119 are also in the running.

In addition to the 3D printing effort at Tuskegee, UTEP is partnering with Lockheed Martin and the Army to create a manufacturing ecosystem in the southwest that addresses a skills shortage. The partnership will provide curricula, internships and apprenticeships in design and production of composites and PCBs. And at VSU, it will create a pilot program to advance research, education, and outreach to undergraduate and graduate students at VSU and Old Dominion University (ODU) in Norfolk, Va., focused on advancing on all fronts of manufacturing in this sector.

The NASA program will provide almost $1.5 million to fund curriculum-based learning, research, training, internships and apprenticeships at the three universities to meet the growing demand for expertise and techniques in high-volume aerospace manufacturing.

You can read more about this in the news release.

A special tip-of-the-hat to loyal reader Freddie, who drew my attention to this story.

Military
An Air Force airman who fell out of the C-130 he was flying in over the Gulf of Mexico still hasn't been found. The search is now considered a recovery effort, and it's focused on an area south of the Florida Panhandle between Destin and Pensacola, Fla.

The plane was based at Hurlburt Field, Fla., near Mary Esther. Officials received the report that the airman from the 24th Special Operations Wing fell into the water on Tuesday around 11:30 a.m. The staff sergeant was in training at the time and fell from the aircraft at about 1,500 feet. His name has not yet been released. Others in the plane saw the airman's parachute deploy and that he was treading water once he landed. (Post)

-- The Blue Angels are wrapping up another season with a Homecoming Air Show Saturday at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. The Blue Angels fly at about 2 p.m. There was also a show Friday. (Post)

Contracts
UTS Systems LLC, Fort Walton Beach, Fla., was awarded a maximum $200 million contract for commercial shelters. This is a one-year base contract with three one-year option periods. Location of performance is Florida, with a Nov. 7, 2020, performance completion date. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pa.

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Week in review (10/27 to 11/2)

Major changes continue in the aerospace industry, and the latest is of interest to the Gulf Coast aerospace region. Bombardier's aerospace operations in Northern Ireland, Morocco and Texas, are being sold to Kansas-based Spirit AeroSystems in a deal valued at $1.1 billion.

The Canadian company put the factories up for sale in May as part of a reorganization drive. The three operations have a combined total of some 4,000 employees, with about 3,600 of them in the Northern Ireland Belfast operation.

Spirit is a major supplier to Airbus and Boeing. Earlier this year the company said it wanted to do more work for Airbus. Buying Bombardier's Northern Ireland operation is part of that strategy.

The wings for the A220 are made at the Belfast plant and it also supplies other Airbus parts, particularly engine covers. The Texas operation being purchased is a maintenance, repair and overhaul facility in Dallas. (Stories: BBC, Financial Times, Bombardier)

Airbus earlier this year expressed some interest in buying the Belfast plant. In May Airbus CEO Guillaume Faury said that this would be an option for Airbus, effectively leading to the manufacturer taking control of the wing production for its A220 airliner, as well as engine covers for its A320 series.

Purchase of the Belfast operation would have added to Airbus’s operations in the UK, which include wing manufacture for most of its commercial aircraft products at Broughton, North Wales, as well as production and design of wings at Filton, near Bristol. (Previous post)

In June, Bombardier said it would sell its regional jet business to Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd (MHI) for $550 million in cash. That marked the Canadian plane and train maker’s exit from commercial aviation. Montreal-based Bombardier had combined its aviation units to focus more on profitable business jets and passenger rail cars, after facing a cash-crunch in 2015 while bringing its flagship commercial jet to market. Bombardier will continue to assemble its regional jet planes (CRJ), but will stop making the aircraft in the second half of 2020 after delivering its remaining orders. (Previous post)

Bombardier last year agreed to make Airbus a majority partner in a partnership that builds the A220, the former Bombardier CSeries. That partnership led to the creation of a new A220 assembly line in Mobile, Ala.

Contracts – F-35
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded a $7 billion modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification provides for the procurement of 114 F-35 aircraft for Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy; non-Department of Defense (DoD) participants, and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers.

Work will be performed in Texas, California, Florida, New Hampshire, Maryland, the United Kingdom, Italy, and Japan, and various locations outside the continental U.S. and is expected to be completed in March 2023.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, also was awarded a $10.6 million modification to a previously awarded contract. This modification provides for the development and delivery of an enhanced simulator database and project management support for the F-35 aircraft in support of the government of Japan.

The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity for both contracts. Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is home of an F-35 training center and F-35 reprogramming labs.

Contracts – other
The Superior Forge & Steel Corp., Lima, Ohio; and Ellwood National Forge, Irvine, Pa., were awarded $90 million multiple award contracts. These contracts provided for the procurement of GBU-57 Massive Ordnance Penetrators BLU-J 27C/B Penetrator warhead case assemblies with associated components. Work will be performed at Lima and Irvine and is expected to be complete by Oct. 28, 2027. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., is the contracting activity. … General Dynamics Information Technology Inc., Fairfax, Va., was awarded a $46.1 million modification to a previously awarded contract to execute Award Term 4 for integrated logistics support for multiple Foreign Military Sales customers. Some of the work will be performed in Pensacola, Fla. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Md., is the contracting activity.